Oscar Wilde's exhibition at the Petit Palais

Oscar Wilde's exhibition at the Petit Palais

A man with an absolute impertinence

My dear readers,

I can not tell you about our beautiful capital without mentioning an aesthetic character, symbol of dandyism during the 19th century. A man whom I admired all my youth and who still inspires me today with the intensity of his thoughts that his pen offers us. A man, fallen in love with our city of light and who has devoted his prose, even more, his whole life. A man who taught me through these works that "The true value of a man lies not in what he has but in what he is." Perhaps you would have seen what author it was. Indeed, I wanted by this praise to highlight "L'impertinence Absolu", Mr. Oscar Fingal O'Flahertie Wills Wilde, better known under the diminutive of Oscar Wilde. It is particularly difficult to convey you in few words my passion for this author.

I am proud of the city of Paris, but I must tell you that I was greatly disappointed when, on the day that marked the hundredth anniversary of his disappearance, the disappearance of a man who has not ceased to promote hedonism and the famous parisian Art of Living has not been celebrated before today. It must be emphasized, all the more so as the man in question lost his life in these place.

The dandysm

Although it is particularly critical before the visit, I must admit that despite this delay, I was amazed by the experience offered by the Petit Palais. First of all, the whole of this collection was borrowed in Ireland, England of course, but also in the United States, as well as in some French museums such as the Musée d'Orsay, all sublimated by pieces from of different private collections.

This exhibition has perfectly illuminated the life of the author and especially the works of this francophone and intense francophile through a set of more than 200 exceptional pieces and unpublished documents. From manuscripts to photographs, drawings, caricatures and personal belongings, I was amazed by the richness of this exhibition and, above all, to have the privilege of having contemplated it.

This exhibition tells the story of a brilliant student who attended the most prestigious and renowned schools in Great Britain, including Oxford, a young writer of talent broken by love, including the hatred of her lover's father who led him to exile himself to Paris, where his illustrious spirit flew through the skies.

The end of this news is probably the most delicate I have ever had to choose. I will finish this article on one of his noble thoughts that inspired me so much. " The follies are the only things that you will never regret. » Oscar Wilde.

See you soon!